Tag Archives: Lina’s

More Homes Needed as ‘Kitten Season’ gets Underway

The sharp rise in the number of kittens this time of year is known as ‘kitten season’, and is the busiest of the year for Lina’s.

SnowyKittens Scarlett and Babies4 Scarlett and Babies5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tilly and kittens

SnowyBlaze

Tolly (M)

Tolly- reserved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Although the post-Christmas rush emptied many of our foster homes, they’re quickly filling back up again with mums and kittens found on the street. All are cold, miserable, and would not have survived without Lina’s stepping in to help them.

We desperately need more foster homes to take in these new cats and kittens, and ask that anybody who can find a temporary space for a little one gets in touch with us.

We’re also hoping that many of our kittens get adopted quickly so that we can take in even more. Please take a look at our ‘Adopt a Cat or Kitten’ page for more information

And if anybody can help in any way, no matter how small, we ask you to make a donation through Paypal (linascatrescue@gmail.com). Almost all of the £20,000 we raised last year was spent on veterinary treatment for ill and injured cats coming into our care. You can also give donations of food or equipment so that we can fit out our foster homes and get these little ones inside as quickly as possible.

This is the busiest time of year for us and we are very grateful for anything that we receive.

 

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FIV+ Cats- Debunking the Myth

Written by: Helen McCallum
Helen is a third year veterinary student at the University of Nottingham. She has an interest in feline medicine, has recently completed a dissertation on FIV in cats, and would like to go into small animal practice when she graduates.


 

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a virus which infects domestic cats worldwide. A cat that is infected is FIV positive (FIV+), and non-infected cats are FIV negative. Unfortunately, FIV positive cats can be overlooked at adoption centres, or are put to sleep unnecessarily because of health concerns or a lack of people looking to take them on. Lina’s is proud that we accept FIV+ cats… but what does that mean for you?

How is the virus spread from cat to cat?
The virus is spread by biting. Generally, FIV is regarded as a virus of fighting cats, with stray and male cats having a greater risk of contracting the virus.


What happens after a cat is infected?
It’s difficult to determine exactly what happens as FIV can cause an array of conditions, which may affect many parts of the body. The majority of the disease course has no symptoms, lasting a long time (often the majority of the cat’s life). Overall, the virus causes immunosuppression, so infected cats are more likely to suffer recurrent health problems, especially later in life.

When the terminal stage is reached clinical disease is seen, which may include dental disease, skin conditions, cancer, neurological disease, renal disease, gastrointestinal disorders, upper respiratory tract and urinary infections. However, as can be seen from this list, these could be experienced by any cat, FIV+ or not!  A cat can’t be cured of the virus – it is there in the body for a lifetime.
How do I know a cat is infected?
A SNAP test carried out by a vet will be able to tell you if a cat is infected or not. These SNAP tests often test for Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) as well, which is not to be confused with FIV. Vets will often test stray, male cats they may come across, as these are at higher risk of being positive.


How long do FIV+ cats live for?
No one can predict the lifespan of an FIV+ cat, just in the same way that no one can predict the lifespan of a healthy cat. However, studies have found that FIV infection does not adversely affect lifespan when compared to FIV negative cats. This means FIV cats can live to similar ages to non-infected cats.

 

So what do I have to do with my FIV+ cat?
Health Monitoring
Health monitoring is important as FIV+ cats are more likely suffer recurrent health problems. Taking them to the vet at the first sign of anything out of the normal is crucial. A vet may prescribe medication for any conditions the cat is suffering, or carry out any procedures that are required, like dentals in the case of dental disease.
Practicalities of Keeping FIV+ Cats
FIV+ cats should be kept indoors to stop them spreading the virus to outdoor cats through biting. This will also keep them safe from anything which could infect them, such as parasites they could pick up from hunting, or indeed viruses they may contract from other cats. Some say that FIV+ cats should be kept as a single cat or segregated from any other cats in the same household, to prevent the virus spreading. However, as the virus spreads via bites, some say that FIV+ and negative cats can mix in a household as long as they get on and do not fight. However, bear in mind that FIV+ cats should be isolated if an infection is present amongst any other household cats. This is because an infection could pass to the FIV+ cat, causing further complications.

So having an FIV+ cat is not the end of the world- in fact, people often don’t even know they’ve got an FIV+ cat! This disease usually only causes problems towards the end of a cat’s life- when all cats become more likely to get diseases! FIV+ cats make fantastic pets, just like any other cat, so please don’t pass over them!

 

Lina’s accept FIV+ cats, and do an FIV/FeLV check when we first get an at-risk cat brought in. We will declare whether a cat is FIV+ on enquiry or during your home visit.

Diary of a Fosterer

For those of you who aren’t sure whether or not to foster, read this ‘Diary of a Fosterer’, which has been written by one of our new foster-carers this year.

15th November
We picked our foster cat up today! He cried for the whole car journey, and disappeared as soon as I let him out. I don’t know where he hid, but within the hour he was nervously exploring- he found me waiting with a bag of treats! He’s found his litter tray and is already using it- yay! He seems to be eating well and I get the feeling he won’t let me forget when it’s mealtime!

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16th November
He’s already settling in, sleeping on my lap or right next to me. He lets me pick him up too! He doesn’t seem interested in playing though, and he still jumps if somebody walks past the road outside, or if the door opens! He’s got several hidey-holes that he goes to, but he’s spending more time out of them than in them!

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24th November
Caesar had to go for his second lot of vaccinations today. He didn’t want to go in his carrier and cried the whole way to the vets. The vet reckons he’s healthy though, and he didn’t even notice his vaccinations being done! I asked about his teeth as he seems to be drooling a bit, but the vet said they’re fine! I also had to flea treat him when we got home, but that was easy enough!

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26th November
He had a very busy day today, as somebody came to view him for adoption. I picked him up and explained that he’s very gentle, but he’s such a big boy I think they were put off. I boiled him up a little pheasant and he devoured it, and he’s now showing how much he loves me by sitting on my feet!

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10th December
I’ve been doing a lot of wrapping on the floor and Caesar seems to love it! He’s started playing with the ribbon or climbing into my lap when I’m cross-legged! He provides us with so much entertainment, especially as he’s started ‘hunting’- watching him pounce on his toys and wrestle with them makes us so happy!

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18th December
We’re going away for Christmas, so Lina’s have organised somebody else to have him whilst we’re away. She came over to collect him this afternoon. He didn’t want to leave, but I’m sure he’s going to have an amazing Christmas and be spoilt rotten! We miss him already though- it’s going to be hard to give him up when somebody adopts him, but at least we’ll have another incoming cat and we get to help more!

28th December
We picked Caesar up from his Christmas foster home. He’s had a lovely time and has been very well looked after- he didn’t want to leave! He’s home now and back to lying on the sofa- that didn’t take long! He had to have his flea treatment as well, which he didn’t enjoy- I’m now not the favourite parent!

20th January
Caesar had another visit today, and this time he got lucky and was reserved! I’m so proud of him but really sad that he’ll be leaving us soon. His new owner seems lovely though, so I’m sure he’ll be happy!

30th January
Caesar’s new mum has passed her home visit. Now all that’s left to do is to organise his vet check and collection. I’ve come around to the idea that he’s leaving now- I’m looking forward to seeing who my next ward will be!

 

2014 Figures Show Excellent Progress

Lina’s end-of-year figures have now been released, and they show just how much hard work has been done by everybody in 2014. Here is a statement from the director, Sheryl Leonardi.

313 cats and kittens successfully adopted.
57 cats neutered through our new neutering scheme which only started in September.

Annual income £26,845
£21,111 spent on vet bills which includes just under £1,500 on the neutering scheme.
Remaining spent on flea/worm treatment, food and various other things such as advertising, equipment, etc.

We never have over £600 in the bank which I make sure we always have for emergencies, our income is spent almost as soon as it comes in.

It’s amazing to think that such a small charity, which works entirely through volunteers, has rehomed 313 cats this year! These cats have been rescued from the street, from ‘free to a good home’ ads and as private rehomes from owners that can no longer keep them.

Our new neutering scheme was only begun in September, and enables anybody to get free neutering, regardless of whether they are on benefits or with a low income. This is unique among local neutering schemes, and all we ask in return is as much as you can afford to give towards it. And since September, this scheme has contributed to the neutering of nearly 60 cats- thats one every two days for the time it has been running!

We would like to thank all of our fosterers, fundraisers, volunteers and friends for all of their support, and to remind you how you can support us in 2015.

Fostering: We are always looking for new fosterers as we work entirely through foster homes. Please see the ‘Foster For Us’ page for more information.

Donating: We are always extremely grateful for any donations you can give.
Money can be donated through:

  • Paypal by using the email address linascatrescue@gmail.com
  • Giving cash to any fosterer
  • By BACS to Miss S Leonardi, Santander, Account no 88092680 Sort code 09-01-26
  • By phone St Leonard’s Vets, who will be able to take card payments directly onto our account.

We also love donations of food or equipment, which are shared between fosterers as fairly as possible. Please contact us to arrange pick up or delivery. You can also buy us something from our Amazon wishlist, which is available here.

We also take donations of unwanted gifts, toys or bric-a-brac which we sell at various events to raise money for Lina’s. Please contact us to arrange this. Of course, attending our table-top sales and buying from us is great too!

Facebook:

Join our Facebook group (here) to show your support and join our community of cat lovers. We post regular updates about all our cats and offer advice to struggling cat owners.

As always, thank you for your support for 2014, and we look forward to working with you all in 2015!